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7 Surprising Health Benefits of Drinking Pickle Juice

By Coti Howell | 2 years

Pickle juice is usually just what we throw away when we’re done with our prepackaged pickles. It keeps our pickled treats moist and fresh in the jar, but we usually don’t think to drink it. (OK, well sometimes we drink it after a shot of whiskey but that’s a completely different story.) The juice has electrolytes, antioxidants and some other very surprising health benefits.

Here are six stellar reasons why you should start drinking pickle juice.

1. Workout Rebuilder

Pickles can be used both before and after a workout. Nutritionist Anshul Jaibharat told Smart Cooky that it’s a healthy workout treat because it gets nutrients straight to the body. “Pickle juice is really popular with athletes when it comes to pre or post workout meals,” Jaibharat says. “The body loses both sodium and potassium while sweating during a workout, and needs to maintain the electrolyte balance. The calcium chloride and vinegar present in pickle juice makes the sodium and potassium more readily absorbed by the body.” This post-workout drink can help you avoid muscle cramps and encourage weight loss.

2. Hangover Remedy

Who doesn’t love a good hangover cure? Pickle juice may be the answer you need after a long night of drinking. Much like sports drinks, the juice contains electrolytes and high sodium content which will help you rehydrate, so you’ll be feeling better in no time. Another added bonus? Dill pickle juice hides the strong smell of alcohol on your breath the morning after, so your co-workers will never know. Cheers!

3. Relieves Cramps

The same benefits that help you before and after a workout also help to prevent cramps. Pickle juice is a great option for women dealing with PMS, as it can help to prevent menstrual cramps, bloating and curbs cravings for salty foods.

4. Aids in Digestion

The vinegar in pickle juice may not be all that tasty, but it’ll help your digestive tract. Doctors believe that the juice helps to maintain a healthy balance of good bacteria in your stomach. So you may want to add some pickle juice to your annual Thanksgiving spread. A small serving is also a great cure for an upset stomach.

5. Provides Antioxidants

Who knew pickles are a health food? Pickle juice is also chock full of antioxidants, which “protect the body from damage caused by harmful molecules called free radicals.” Antioxidants are thought to prevent some cancers, arthritis and possibly Alzheimer’s.

6. Relieves Heartburn

Pesky heartburn pains could no longer be a problem thanks to pickle juice! Medical Daily says the vinegar actually helps some people ward off heartburn. This isn’t a tried and true remedy, though, because vinegar can actually cause heartburn for some people.

Did you know pickle juice now even comes in cans? Just crack one open and reap the health benefits.

7. Cures Headaches

Many people with chronic diseases, migraines and other health problems can benefit from drinking pickle juice. By raising your sodium levels, your body will retain more water, which increases your blood pressure. So make sure your sodium intake is monitored by a professional.

Originally Published: https://www.wideopencountry.com/pickle-juice-health-benefits/

The Science Behind Everyone’s New Obsession With Pickle Juice

By Lana Bandoim | Forbes Contributor | Sep 21, 2018

From deep-fried pickles to dill pickle chips, pickles in different varieties are showing up on more menus and grocery store shelves. At the Natural Products Expo East, the trend continued this year with the Pickle Juice Company featuring pickle juice sports drinks. There are many reasons why this salty trend is not going away soon.

Walk through the aisles of today’s grocery store, and you will probably see pickles featured in several places, in addition to the canned goods section. You can pick up a bag of pickle popcorn, grab some dill pickle chips and maybe try the frozen pickle pops. Now, pickle juice is growing in popularity, and even Sonic released a pickle juice slush. You no longer have to purchase a jar of pickles to get the juice since it is sold on its own in a variety of forms. You can find pickle juice sports drinks, shots and alcohol.

By 2020, Statista’s prediction, based on U.S. Census data and Simmons National Consumer Survey (NHCS), is that 245.56 million Americans will eat pickles. Likewise, Technavio’s report shows that the global pickles market will continue to grow and will have a value of $12.74 billion by 2020. In the United States, it is expected to have a value of $6.70 billion by 2020.

The reasons why you crave salty foods, like pickles, can vary. Similar to sugar, salt can be addictive, and researchers at the Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health found the brain pathway responsible for the craving. They discovered that a specific circuit, which is part of the brain’s opioid system, can also make you want salt. In addition, you can build a tolerance to salty foods, so you need more of them to activate the reward center of the brain.

Some other common reasons for craving pickles include dehydration, electrolyte imbalances or Addison’s disease. Pregnant women often want pickles because nausea and morning sickness can also make them dehydrated. All of these medical conditions can make you turn to salty foods or pickle juice as a way to restore the electrolyte imbalance in the body.

There is a positive side to the current pickle juice obsession. For years, athletes have been drinking pickle juice to relieve muscle cramps after exercising, and it is one of the multiple health benefits. A study published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise found that pickle juice works better than water at reducing muscle cramps. Another study showed that pickle juice could lower blood sugar spikes in healthy adults. In addition, pickle juice has a variety of antioxidants, including vitamin C and E.

Here is another reason why you may have a hard time resisting pickle juice: Your digestive system benefits from it, so you feel better after drinking it. The juice contains vinegar, which is fermented, and good for your gut. Researchers also found that pickle juice can slow down gastric emptying.

If you do not have any health problems and can tolerate salt, then do not feel guilty about drinking pickle juice in moderation.

Originally Published: https://www.forbes.com/sites/lanabandoim/2018/09/21/the-science-behind-everyones-new-obsession-with-pickle-juice/

Drinking Pickle Juice: 10 Reasons It’s All the Rage

Medically reviewed by Natalie Butler, RD, LD on May 3, 2016 — Written by Alli Rainey

At first, drinking pickle juice might sound kind of gross. But there are several reasons to consider it.

Athletes have been sipping this briny beverage for years. Experts didn’t know all the reasons why pickle juice was good to drink after exercising. They just knew that it seemed to help relieve cramps.

They were right. It appears to help with muscle cramps, plus more. Here’s a look at 10 healthy benefits of drinking pickle juice.

1. It soothes muscle cramps

Dehydrated men experienced faster relief from muscle cramps after drinking pickle juice, according to a study published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.

About 1/3 cup of pickle juice is all it took to have this effect. Pickle juice relieved cramps more than drinking the same amount of water. It also helped more than drinking nothing at all.

This could be because the vinegar in pickle juice may help with rapid pain relief. Vinegar may help stop nerve signals that make tired muscles cramp.

2. It helps you stay hydrated

For most people, drinking water for hydration after a workout is fine. Water is probably all you need if you’re exercising moderately or for an hour or less.

But it’s a different story if you’re exercising hard, exercising for longer than an hour at a time, or exercising in hot climates.

Drinking something with sodium and potassium can help you get hydrated faster. Sodium is an electrolyte that you lose when you sweat. Potassium is another electrolyte lost in sweat.

Pickle juice contains a lot of sodium. It also has some potassium. After a sweaty or lengthy exercise session, sipping some pickle juice can help your body recover to its normal electrolyte levels more quickly.

Watching your sodium intake or on a low-sodium diet? Be sure to check with your doctor and dietitian about pickle juice before drinking it.

3. It’s a fat-free recovery aid

If you’re trying to lose weight, you’re probably not too psyched about consuming high-calorie sports drinks.

It’s still a good plan to replace lost electrolytes after exercising hard, for a long time, or in hot weather. Plus, if your muscles are cramping, you’ll probably want relief as fast as possible.

Pickle juice to the rescue! Pickle juice contains no fat, but it can have some calories. It can have anywhere from zero to 100 calories per 1-cup serving. The amount of calories depends on what’s in the pickling solution.

4. It won’t bust your budget

If you already eat pickles regularly, you don’t have to spend money on sports drinks. Even if you don’t eat pickles, you can still choose pickle juice as a budget-friendly alternative to more expensive workout beverages.

You can also buy commercially prepared pickle juices marketed as sports drinks. They cost more than drinking what’s left in your pickle jar when all the pickles are gone. The upside is that you’ll know from reading the nutrition label what you’re getting in each serving.

5. It contains antioxidants

Pickle juice has significant amounts of vitamins C and E, two key antioxidants. Antioxidants help shield your body from damaging molecules called free radicals. Everyone gets exposed to free radicals, so having plenty of antioxidants in your diet is a good idea.

Vitamins C and E also help boost your immune system function, among other roles they play in your body.

6. It may support your weight loss efforts

Pickle juice contains lots of vinegar. Consuming a little bit of vinegar every day may help you lose weight, as reported in Bioscience, Biotechnology, and Biochemistry.

After 12 weeks, study participants who had consumed either about 1/2 ounce or 1 ounce of vinegar daily had lost more weight and fat than those who hadn’t consumed any vinegar.

7. It helps control blood sugar levels

A study published in the Journal of Diabetes Research showed the effects of consuming a small serving of vinegar before a meal. The vinegar helped regulate blood sugar levels after the meal in people with type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is associated with being overweight and obese.

Well-regulated blood sugar levels help keep you healthy. Lots of people have type 2 diabetes and don’t know it. Unregulated blood sugar can cause serious health problems such as blindness, heart damage, and kidney damage.

8. It boosts gut health

The vinegar in pickle juice can help your belly stay healthy, too. Vinegar is a fermented food. Fermented foods are good for your digestive system. They encourage the growth and healthy balance of good bacteria and flora in your gut.

9. Dill is healthy

Choose dill pickle juice for more potential benefits. Dill has quercetin in it. Quercetin has cholesterol-lowering properties. A study published in Cholesterol found that dill lowered cholesterol in hamsters. It may have a similar effect in humans.

The study’s authors also mentioned that dill has many traditional medicinal uses. These include treating:

  • indigestion
  • stomach cramps
  • gas
  • other digestive ailments

10. It sweetens your breath

Even if it makes your lips pucker when you drink it, a little bit of pickle juice might make for sweeter breath.

Bacteria in your mouth can cause bad breath. Both dill and vinegar have antibacterial properties. This potent combination may help freshen your breath after you drink pickle juice.

Next steps

Instead of dumping that leftover liquid from your pickle jar down the drain, consider saving it for future use.

You might even find yourself enjoying the salty flavor. Things can taste differently after you exercise than they do normally. So even if pickle juice doesn’t sound amazing right now, maybe it will hit the spot after your next workout.

Even if you don’t ever love the taste, you may end up deciding that drinking pickle juice is worth it for the health benefits.

Originally Published: https://www.healthline.com/health/food-nutrition/drinking-pickle-juice

Get Pikl’ed note: some links have been removed which will not affect this articles content

8 Benefits Of Pickle Juice That Will Make You Want To Drink Some ASAP

Goodbye, salt craving.

Aryelle Siclait Jun 2, 2019

Everyone loves a good pickle (my deepest condolences to the wayward taste buds out there that can’t appreciate them).

However, since pickles are the stars of the jar, too often the juice—you know the stuff responsible for turning your everyday cucumber into crunchy, sour goodness—gets tossed out and forgotten. But not today. Today, pickle juice will get the credit it so rightfully deserves.

After all, the simple liquid packs tons of benefits that nutritionists say you need to take advantage of as soon as the last pickle is gone. So yes, consider this your excuse to buy another jar of pickles, stat. You’re welcome.

1. It’s a next-level source of hydration.

“Pickle juice contains [sodium], potassium, and water, which are all important for hydration,” says Alyssa Lavy, RD. And while water usually does the trick, if you need replenishment after a super hard workout or long day in the sun, electrolytes (a blanket term for good-for-you minerals, including sodium and potassium) can help. And that’s where pickle juice’s all-in-one status comes in clutch.

Lavy says approximately one and a half to three ounces of pickle juice per day should suffice—whether you’re drinking the stuff straight or diluting it with water to tone down the flavor.

That said, pickle juice doesn’t skimp on the sodium—three ounces (or six tablespoons) has 690 mg. “So, you may want to limit your intake if you’re watching sodium in your diet or already eating a high-sodium diet.” (FYI, the FDA recommends consuming 2,300 milligrams a day.) Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

Here’s the rest of the pickle juice’s nutrient lineup, in a three-ounce serving, according to the USDA:

  • Calories: 15
  • Protein: 0 g
  • Fat: 0 g
  • Carbohydrates: 3 g
  • Sodium: 690 mg

2. It’s great for workout recovery.

Water is typically all you’ll need before and during a workout, but if you’re really going hard (like, athlete-level), you’ll need a few more of those aforementioned electrolytes. And pickle juice is THE recovery fluid for replenishing the electrolytes lost during a major sweat session. Plus, it can even help with post-workout muscle cramping.

3. It’s loaded with probiotics.

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Pickle juice is here to work magic on your gut. Okay, well not magic necessarily, but since pickles are fermented, Lavy says, they’re packing tons of probiotics.

That said, Lavy recommends keeping an eye on the labels of store-bought jars. Some “commercially-produced pickles are not likely to contain probiotics, due to processing.” That’s because, in order to extend their shelf-life, they’re manufactured using vinegar and heat, which typically destroys the gut-loving active cultures. So, keep an eye out for vinegar on the ingredients list, it might clue you in on whether those particular pickles are packing probiotics.

Or, if you’re really dedicated, you could just pickle your cucumbers right at home. (Just be sure to go for a classic pickling recipe that involves salt, water, and cucumbers—no vinegar.)

4. It will satisfy your salt craving.

If you find yourself reaching for a bag of chips or pretzels when that 3 p.m. hunger pang hits, Monica Auslander Moreno, RD, nutrition consultant for RSP Nutrition, says pickle juice might just be the nutrient-dense (and tasty) alternative you’re looking for. After all, it tastes just like the pickles that were once inside the jar.

5. It helps regulate blood sugar levels.

While pickle juice made with vinegar may not have probiotic benefits, it does come with its own perks. “Pickle juice may help regulate blood sugar levels,” says Kelli McGrane, RD for Lose It!. “Studies have shown that when consumed prior to a meal, individuals with type 2 diabetes had reduced blood sugar spikes.” And though the vinegar in pickle juice is largely responsible for improving the body’s response to insulin, I probably don’t need to convince you a shot of vinegar tastes a lot better when it’s masked by the sweet and sour flavors of a pickle.

6. It’s a source of vitamins and antioxidants.

Related Story This Restaurant Replaces Bread With Pickles

Pickle juice is a particularly good source of vitamins A and E. It also contains a trace amount of antioxidants, which help protect your body and its cells from harmful molecules. While other foods have higher concentrations of antioxidants (pickle juice shouldn’t be your go-to source), if you’re already drinking the stuff, know you’re reaping these benefits, too.

7. You can use it to pickle more veggies.

If you’re not planning on tossing a straw into your pickle jar, Moreno suggests using the brine to pickle other vegetables such as carrots, peppers, and beets.

8. It’s cost-effective.

Since pickle juice comes with the pickles you were planning to anyway, this probiotic-packed sports drink is super cost effective. Not to mention, it helps do your part to eliminate food waste. Win, win.

https://www.womenshealthmag.com/food/a27556128/pickle-juice-benefits/
Aryelle Siclait | Assistant Editor | Aryelle Siclait is an assistant editor at Women’s Health